Category Archives: Caroline Whyte

News from the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability (FEASTA) co-founded by Richard Douthwaite

 

Following the May Food for Thought collaborative event, which FEASTA organised in partnership with Afri, Teacht Anair, Food Sovereignty Ireland and the IEN-organised National Biodiversity Week, Caroline Whyte sends news of an event Elements of Change, in Cloughjordan ecovillage, Co Tipperary, on June 29, organised by Cultivate, which will feature Rob Hopkins among others. The Cultivate website has more details.

Now that we have declared a climate and biodiversity emergency, what are we going to do about it? Reimagine how we transition to a low carbon, biodiverse and just society.

 

 

 

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News from FEASTA – founded by Richard Douthwaite

 

Caroline Whyte, who has been involved with Feasta since 2002, studied ecological economics at Mälardalen University in Sweden.

Browsing the site today I was reminded that the subject of her masters thesis was the relationship between central banking and sustainability  She notes:

“Back when I did a masters thesis on central banking and sustainability in 2006, there was very little official recognition on the part of any government or central bank that private banks are directly responsible for money creation – although the Swedish central banker I interviewed for my research acknowledged it immediately when it came up, and if you looked hard enough you could already find references to it elsewhere too”.

Early in December a mailing brought news of a groundbreaking evening on soil & climate action, at Cloughjordan ecovillage in Tipperary (below), with delicious food from ‘said soil’ and a call to action on the dancefloor. There was also art, live music, poetry and DJs as part of the Global Green Christmas Party and World Soils Day. Dr. Ollie Moore, who manages Cloughjordan’s community farm was in discussion with UCD & Friends of the Earth’s Cara Augustenborg.

 

Another discovery on FEASTA’s website was Mike Sandler’s article Climate dividends and the Yellow Vests – extract below:

Climate dividends, which return money from a carbon price back to people, provide a direct solution to the yellow vests concerns, while putting income inequality on equal footing with climate concerns.  They would counteract the regressive impacts of diesel fuel charges, and send money to the very people who need it most.

The yellow vests undoubtedly want a livable planet for their children.  Climate dividends can help change the perception that addressing climate change will be costly to working class people.

Canada is starting to look at dividends as part of their carbon pricing strategy. Perhaps Prime Minister Justin Trudeau could make a call to President Macron and suggest offering climate dividends to the yellow vests.

Climate dividends is a simple solution (based on more complex economics, but let’s leave that for later), and the benefit to the public is that, when paired with an economywide cap, it will reduce emissions, return money to households, and provide a start to a universal basic income.

The main obstacle facing climate dividends is that many politicians are less motivated to give the money back to people, when they could instead spend the money on big projects (such as high-speed rail in California)

Climate dividends could be the solutions the yellow vests are looking for.  Will Macron or others recognize it in time?

 

 

 

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News from the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability

Our late colleague, Richard Douthwaite, was the co-founder of Feasta (the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability) an Irish-based economic, social and environmental think-tank. He is now represented here by Caroline Whyte.

Anne B. Ryan, chairperson of Feasta trustee board, writes: “Basic Income Ireland is organising a series of events throughout Ireland during the month of Sept, to inform about and discuss their proposals for a basic income in Ireland. Advocates believe that a universal, sufficient and unconditional basic income would be a crucial ingredient in a transition to a more sustainable and equal society and economy. Many members of Feasta also take this view and see BI as an important systemic intervention that would have important short-term benefits but that also has the capacity to support the more far-reaching transformations we need. Read more about basic income at www.basicincomeireland.com.”

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Sat Sept 1. Common Ground, Beverly Studios, Bray, Co Wicklow. 1-3pm. BII members will have a stall at the monthly market.

Thurs Sept 6. Ox Mountain Heritage Centre, Tubbercurry, Co Sligo, 7pm Talk and discussion.

Thurs Sept 6. Gullane’s Hotel, Ballinasloe, Co Galway. 7pm. Talk and discussion.

Thurs Sept 13 East Clare Co-op, Scariff, Co Clare. Time to be confirmed. For details please see http://www.eastclarecommunitycoop.com/
and https://www.basicincomeireland.com/news

Fri Sept 14, Royal Irish Academy, Dawson St, Dublin, 6.15pm. Frances Coppola will examine the economic potential which could be unlocked in Ireland by offering its citizens the security of a basic income. Coppola is an internationally-acclaimed economics commentator, writer, musician, and former banking professional and she writes the Coppola Comment blog http://www.coppolacomment.com/. The event will be chaired by journalist and broadcaster Vincent Browne. You need to register for this event on https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/hidden-productivity-unlocking-economic-value-with-basic-income-in-ireland-tickets-49268936716 and the cost is €5 for those on a wage.

Six later events are listed here. http://www.feasta.org/2018/08/30/basic-income-roadshow-in-ireland-september-2018/

 

 

 

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News from Feasta: Water Protectors

Feasta*, Afri, Comhlámh and Friends of the Earth organised a public meeting at The Teacher’s Club, Parnell Square, Dublin last week.

An online search revealed that the Water Protector Legal Collective (WPLC) is is the legal team for the ceremonial resistance camps at Standing Rock, North Dakota. The Energy Transfer Partners‘ Dakota Access Pipeline in the northern United States was projected to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois, crossing beneath the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, as well as under part of Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. 

WPLC is dedicated to protecting the sovereign treaty rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and providing legal representation and coordination for Water Protectors engaged in resistance to the Dakota Access Pipeline crossing the Missouri River which constitutes a threat to the region’s clean water and to ancient burial grounds.

 

It maintains a presence on-site and provide legal advocacy, jail and court support, criminal defence, and civil and human rights protection to the native people and their allies gathered there. There is more information about events there and several videos at: http://bsnorrell.blogspot.co.uk/2016/11/standing-rock-prayers-at-water-live-now.html

 

For new readers: Caroline Whyte links us with the work of the late Richard Douthwaite, co-founder of FEASTA, whose books included ‘The Growth Illusion’ and recently we received the information-packed annual report for 2014 & 2015. See their website: http://www.feasta.org/.

 

 

 

 

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News from the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability: residential courses

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Cad a dhéanfaimid feasta gan adhmad? Tá deireadh na gcoillte ar lár

What will we do in the future without wood? The end of the forests has come.

Feasta‘s aim is “to identify the characteristics (economic, cultural and environmental) of a truly sustainable society, articulate how the necessary transition can be effected and promote the implementation of the measures required for this purpose”. (http://www.feasta.org).

Today the challenges seem greater than ever. How can the human species learn to live in harmony with the Earth, the rest of the natural world and with each other? For the last 15 years the Retreat Lodges at Rossbeigh, Co Kerry have proved to be a good place to think and talk about these issues: built with stone walls and a slate roof, the windows look out over tidal marshes and sand-dunes to the forty-mile long Dingle Peninsula and across Dingle Bay to the Blasket Islands and the Atlantic.

John Jopling is now re-launching the week-long Feasta residential courses held here for the last 16 years. The following programme is proposed:

  •  Series title: “Learning for the Future”.
  •  The courses will be held once a year – possibly increasing to twice a year
  •  They will ideally be announced 6 months ahead, naming subjects and key people.
  •  The first week in the new format will be the last week of June 2017.
  •  Each week will feature three or four main subjects.
  •  Each subject will be led by a key person.
  •  There will be 8 or 10 other participants.
  •  In addition there will be time for single session topics using “Open Space”.
  •  These might include talks about eg local wildlife.
  •  and/or ideas people are working on.
  •  Reading matter may be circulated to intended participants in advance.

Relevant topics could include:

  •  Gaia, Dark Mountain, systems-change and emergence, the Viable Systems Model.
  •  Climate change, biodiversity, the interdependence of species, other global boundaries.
  •  governance systems and economic systems such as De-growth
  •  the role of compassion and non-violence.
  •  commons, localisation, global citizenship, community ownership, co-ops, co-housing, community currencies, permaculture.
  •  topics such as wealth, inequality, ownership, corporate structures, money, taxes, citizens income, energy, cities, nano-technology.

Please feel free to suggest other topics – but be prepared to present them and/or suggest people who will, as the guarantee of well prepared discussions by people with expertise is important to making the courses a success.

feasta-iconNote also: The world’s first conference on world basic income was held in Manchester on 4th February 2017.

The event explored a new practical solution to global inequality and poverty. Feasta’s Caroline Whyte, who is involved in the CapGlobalCarbon campaign, was on a panel discussing practicalities.

 

 

 

 

Environmental news from networkers involved with CERE, FEASTA and LOCAL FUTURES

Rashneh, Helena and Richard all met in 2000 at a gathering we held near Bromsgrove.

rashneh csr video

rashneh csr2 logoToday we received a link to a video which we heartily recommend. In it,  networker Rashneh Pardiwala, co-founder of CERE, was interviewed by Pooja Damadia of CSR Journal which seeks to publicise news of good corporate practice. It may be seen here http://thecsrjournal.in/it-is-better-to-abide-by-the-laws-than-trying-ways-to-circumvent-them-dr-rashneh-pardiwala-cere/.

One telling point made was that urban areas benefited from electricity generated in rural Dahanu, whereas Dahanu itself, ironically, is subject to frequent power cuts.

caroline 2 feasta

rashneh feasta coverCaroline Whyte now links us with the work of our networker, the late Richard Douthwaite, co-founder of FEASTA, whose books included The Growth Illusion and recently we received the information-packed annual report for 2014 & 2015. There is even more on their website: http://www.feasta.org/.

The material on fracking, climate change, basic income and monetary reform will be of interest to many outside our network and will be recommended to them. There was reference to the work on biochar which many visitors continue to discover on this website linked with the name of James Bruges. See http://www.feasta.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2014-15_annual_report_feasta.pdf

rashneh helena

Finally we recommend Helena Norberg-Hodge’s truly excellent TedX talk on localisation. See also the website of Local Futures.

Both video presentations prompt the wish for all New Era networkers to present their case in this way and make it available on Youtube. Does anyone know what costs are involved?