Blog Archives

News of Christine Parkinson – and teenagers from Kampala and Mumbai

Reviews of the book which Christine recently finished writing: “Three Generations Left? Human Activity and the Destruction of the Planet” are coming in. We direct readers to the latest one which was written by Caroline Whyte and first published on the FEASTA website,

Christine’s book outlines how so-called progress has combined with a host of other factors, including free trade, a market economy, population increase and the development of a super-rich minority owning most of the wealth of the planet, to bring about global warming and climate change which could lead to a loss of many species and mass human extinction before the end of this century. (Right: book signing at seminar)

It is also constructive – see some proposals published on the West Midlands New Economics website which are to be structured and extended.

Young readers in Uganda and India

Her target audience is aged 15-18 and any adult new to the subject. The writer was struck by the reaction of a teenage visitor from Mumbai (left) when given a copy recently. He looked delighted and not only gave thanks, but after leafing through the book repeated them far more emphatically.

When Charles in Uganda (below) was 15 he wrote about the drama project he founded, focussing on corruption: “You see a change maker doesn’t need to sit and keep quiet when there is an enemy ruining people that is why I never gave up with Drama project because I believe it create changes in this country and all over the world  . . . It hurts me so much when I see some NGOs have stopped to offer their aid to this country because of the rampant growing of a big-headed corruption in this country Uganda and maybe in some other countries also. So you find that the people deep in the villages are the one to suffer – and they suffer a lot.”

Recently Charles – now 19 – who has obtained good exam results, ‘topping’ his schoolmates in economics, history and literature – made a video with the primary purpose of seeking help with fees to enable him to attend university. Like all the young people on the Butterfly Project, he is from one of the poorest of families in his area.

After introducing himself, he refers to the way in which Christine’s book inspired him and strengthened his desire to study economics at university, an education which would enable him to work to address the gap between rich and poor. He speaks of reading about the way economic activity can affect our environment and social lives and of the modern economics in her book – free of greed and selfishness (perhaps referring to New Economics – NEF?)

He ends by saying that he seeks education to fit him to create change in his community.

A UNA reviewer called Christine’s book a wake-up call: “A succession of well-researched and wide-ranging facts substantiate its warning. She addresses readers who are likely to remain sceptical of her predictions, piling fact upon fact, ending with the entreaty, “Look at the evidence”. However sceptical the reader may be, a close consideration of the evidence set out by Dr Parkinson must surely cause such a reader to reconsider his or her opinion”.

Full details about the book, and many articles of interest, may be seen on Christine’s website.

 

 

 

 

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News from John Bunzl: The Simpol Solution – solving global problems could be easier than we think.

John writes:

simpol2-solutionClimate change, mass migration, unfettered corporate power, religious fanaticism, inequality, the rise of the far right . . . Individually these problems are tough enough; combined, they’re surely insurmountable. Or are they? 

The Simpol Solution explains why our efforts to deal with these issues are failing and proposes new ways of thinking that can help us tackle them. Drawing on a multinational movement already gaining momentum among politicians and academics, this game-changing book proposes a solution which shows that solving global problems could be closer than we think. 

The Simpol Solution takes a welcome fresh look at political/economic reality and clearly explains the psychology behind why we need new eyes to see how we might force politicians to change the world on our behalf.’ Joris Luyendijk, author, journalist and talk-show host

‘I nodded until I got a crick in my neck. I haven’t read a book for years that I agreed with so deeply and so consistently – nor felt so keenly that these are messages the world needs to hear.’ Simon Anholt, founder, the Good Country Index

simpol-text

The Simpol Solution shows the real possibilities of a worldcentric paradigm shift, transcending from a competitive to a cooperative evolution and mode of consciousness. A real pleasure to read and a potential political pathbreaker.’ Professor Ugo Mattei, University of California

‘A courageous and urgently needed book.’ Ervin Laszlo, author, philosopher and evolutionary systems theorist

Published by: Peter Owen Publishers, London & Chicago www.peterowen.com. Keep up with all the latest on the book at http://www.simpol.org/index.php?id=545

John Bunzl – Founder & Trustee

International Simultaneous Policy Organisation (ISPO)

http://www.simpol.org

Blog: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/john-bunzl/

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/johnbunzl

YouTube: http://www.simpol.org/index.php?id=19

 

 

 

John Bunzl asks ‘When will we take globalisation seriously?’

As James Robertson summarises in his latest newsletter, John Bunzl opens with a reassurance:

john-bunzl-agm-13“Don’t worry, Trump won’t be able to put much of his extremist rhetoric into practice.

“There are too many checks and balances in the U.S. political system. Both Congress and the Senate may be under Republican control, but the Republican Party is far from synonymous with Trump. And in a highly interdependent world our political leaders don’t have nearly as much power as we think.

Reassurance then gives way as we, the ‘Broad Middle’, are arraigned:

“No, the real danger now is not Trump, Brexit or the rise of the Far Right but the failure of the rest of us – the Broad Middle, as we might call ourselves – to take globalization seriously. The widespread distrust of the political mainstream may be stoked by immigration, unemployment and wealth inequality, but the deeper driver of all these issues is actually globalization. Or, to be more precise, unregulated globalization”.

He then quotes Gordon Brown’s analysis following the Brexit result: “The elephant in the room is globalisation – the speed, scope and scale of the seismic shifts in our global economy. And the most obvious manifestation of the world we have lost is the hollowing out of our industrial towns as a result of the collapse of manufacturing in the face of Asian competition. These towns are home to a disproportionate share of the semi-skilled workers who feel on the wrong side of globalisation and who opted to vote leave. Unable to see how globalisation can be tamed in their interests, they have, not surprisingly, become recruits to an anti-globalisation movement whose lightning rod is migration.”

And asserts that the deeper driver of all these issues is actually unregulated globalisation, itemising a few of the international agreements and regulations needed if the global economy is to work for all:

  • Binding agreements on climate change,
  • on raising fair taxes on the rich and the multi-national corporate tax avoiders
  • and re-distributing the revenue generated to poorer nations, allowing their peoples to make a decent living at home instead of having to migrate.

He says that instead of focusing on these objectives we’ve allowed ourselves to be distracted by all manner of other peripheral concerns. While we, citizens, have immersed ourselves in identity politics, anti-war protesting, and the like, mainstream politicians have been treading water, unable to see the new globalized reality through their out-dated national glasses.

Only when we focus on binding global agreements will we be taking globalization seriously. For only then can we make common cause with the poor and the disaffected middle classes who should be supporting us but who, because of our distraction, have instead been lured to the political extremes.

That doesn’t mean a global government, only global cooperation

simpol-coverHis new book, The Simpol Solution, written with Nick Duffell, sets out the process by which the Broad Middle can make binding global agreements happen and make them stick. Noam Chomsky said , “It’s ambitious and provocative. Can it work? Certainly worth a serious try”.

And Simon Anholt commented, “I nodded until I got a crick in my neck. I haven’t read a book for years that I agreed with so deeply and so consistently – nor felt so keenly that these are messages the world needs to hear. The clarity, simplicity and profound importance of this book are beyond question. Please read it, and please encourage others to do the same.”

 

Read the full article here: www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/john-bunzl/donald-trump_b_12879498.html

 

 

 

Environmental news from networkers involved with CERE, FEASTA and LOCAL FUTURES

Rashneh, Helena and Richard all met in 2000 at a gathering we held near Bromsgrove.

rashneh csr video

rashneh csr2 logoToday we received a link to a video which we heartily recommend. In it,  networker Rashneh Pardiwala, co-founder of CERE, was interviewed by Pooja Damadia of CSR Journal which seeks to publicise news of good corporate practice. It may be seen here http://thecsrjournal.in/it-is-better-to-abide-by-the-laws-than-trying-ways-to-circumvent-them-dr-rashneh-pardiwala-cere/.

One telling point made was that urban areas benefited from electricity generated in rural Dahanu, whereas Dahanu itself, ironically, is subject to frequent power cuts.

caroline 2 feasta

rashneh feasta coverCaroline Whyte now links us with the work of our networker, the late Richard Douthwaite, co-founder of FEASTA, whose books included The Growth Illusion and recently we received the information-packed annual report for 2014 & 2015. There is even more on their website: http://www.feasta.org/.

The material on fracking, climate change, basic income and monetary reform will be of interest to many outside our network and will be recommended to them. There was reference to the work on biochar which many visitors continue to discover on this website linked with the name of James Bruges. See http://www.feasta.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/2014-15_annual_report_feasta.pdf

rashneh helena

Finally we recommend Helena Norberg-Hodge’s truly excellent TedX talk on localisation. See also the website of Local Futures.

Both video presentations prompt the wish for all New Era networkers to present their case in this way and make it available on Youtube. Does anyone know what costs are involved?