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Jackie Carpenter is setting up a cohousing community in Southwest England

Project Q is setting up a new cohousing community in Southwest England, based on Quaker principles (truth, peace, equality and simplicity). Other aspects of the community are up for discussion and debate.

The community will have shared communal spaces and private living spaces, where we will be dedicated to helping people and the environment. It will be:

  • An example of simple, sustainable living, showing people how we can survive and thrive during and after the existential crisis that is threatening us
  • A deeply spiritual space to nurture members; a place where people can come to find spiritual care in connection with the climate and ecological crisis
  • An educational centre teaching practical skills like food-growing and crafts
  • A centre of inspiration and positive thinking
  • A loving community based on Quaker principles (truth, peace, equality and simplicity) with strong links to other Climate Crisis groups.

We are seeking people who will sell their houses and invest their money, or commit to working diligently if they don’t have much money. We shall buy a country estate or farm which already has suitable buildings, move in within a few months (depending on house sale speed!) and devote ourselves to supporting others, helping people to learn to live simply with hope and happiness. In particular we shall aim to help teenagers and young adults find their path in this confusing and mixed-up world.

One corner of Trelay farm

Track record? Read about her earlier experience below* and learn about her first co-housing project on the Trelay Farm website. Day to day living is described here:

Friendship Cohousing – the first Project Q cohousing community – is progressing well. We are close to purchasing a property near Marazion. Our next meeting will be on 11th and 12th January. Contact Jackie@trelay.org for more information.

*

Jackie Carpenter is a chartered mechanical engineer – and in the 80s she managed large projects for Brown and Root. She was President of the Women’s Engineering Society from 2002-03 (see her 2001 paper). In 1995 she changed direction, helping to found the charity Energy21, and was managing director for ten years, promoting community renewable energy – networking with many, notably Hermann Scheer, a member of the Bundestag and President of Eurosolar. Jackie’s Stroud cottage ran on 100% renewable energy. She was President of the Women’s Engineering Society from 2002-03 (see her 2001 paper). In 2007 she moved to Cornwall to help to create a new sustainable community, Trelay, ensuring the long term continuity of the Energy21 Network of community organisations by linking it with the Centre for Alternative Technology.

 

 

 

 

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News from the Foundation for the Economics of Sustainability: residential courses

feasta-header-2

Cad a dhéanfaimid feasta gan adhmad? Tá deireadh na gcoillte ar lár

What will we do in the future without wood? The end of the forests has come.

Feasta‘s aim is “to identify the characteristics (economic, cultural and environmental) of a truly sustainable society, articulate how the necessary transition can be effected and promote the implementation of the measures required for this purpose”. (http://www.feasta.org).

Today the challenges seem greater than ever. How can the human species learn to live in harmony with the Earth, the rest of the natural world and with each other? For the last 15 years the Retreat Lodges at Rossbeigh, Co Kerry have proved to be a good place to think and talk about these issues: built with stone walls and a slate roof, the windows look out over tidal marshes and sand-dunes to the forty-mile long Dingle Peninsula and across Dingle Bay to the Blasket Islands and the Atlantic.

John Jopling is now re-launching the week-long Feasta residential courses held here for the last 16 years. The following programme is proposed:

  •  Series title: “Learning for the Future”.
  •  The courses will be held once a year – possibly increasing to twice a year
  •  They will ideally be announced 6 months ahead, naming subjects and key people.
  •  The first week in the new format will be the last week of June 2017.
  •  Each week will feature three or four main subjects.
  •  Each subject will be led by a key person.
  •  There will be 8 or 10 other participants.
  •  In addition there will be time for single session topics using “Open Space”.
  •  These might include talks about eg local wildlife.
  •  and/or ideas people are working on.
  •  Reading matter may be circulated to intended participants in advance.

Relevant topics could include:

  •  Gaia, Dark Mountain, systems-change and emergence, the Viable Systems Model.
  •  Climate change, biodiversity, the interdependence of species, other global boundaries.
  •  governance systems and economic systems such as De-growth
  •  the role of compassion and non-violence.
  •  commons, localisation, global citizenship, community ownership, co-ops, co-housing, community currencies, permaculture.
  •  topics such as wealth, inequality, ownership, corporate structures, money, taxes, citizens income, energy, cities, nano-technology.

Please feel free to suggest other topics – but be prepared to present them and/or suggest people who will, as the guarantee of well prepared discussions by people with expertise is important to making the courses a success.

feasta-iconNote also: The world’s first conference on world basic income was held in Manchester on 4th February 2017.

The event explored a new practical solution to global inequality and poverty. Feasta’s Caroline Whyte, who is involved in the CapGlobalCarbon campaign, was on a panel discussing practicalities.